Core Conditioning Program

Below you will find the core conditioning program I use with my clients. The purpose of the program is to strengthen the abdominals, obliques, glutes, and hips. To do the program correctly you must perform the two movements together with minimal rest between sets. For example, you would perform a forearm plank followed by side lying straight leg hip abduction. You would then repeat this for the desired amount of sets and reps with minimal rest.

It is imperative that you only advance to the next week's sets and reps if you can complete the amount of work required. The focus should be on quality technique and not the number of repetitions. Please do not rush through the program. Take the time to master the movements and you will be rewarded with a bulletproof core. Perform the program two times per week for 8 weeks.  

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Strengthen The Core With 3 Exercises

In order to squat or deadlift well, you must have a strong core.  When you perform a squat or deadlift, the pelvis will tilt forward slightly to allow the hips to bend and flex. But an excessive lower back arch (anterior pelvic tilt) can limit the ability to squat or deadlift. Put simply, if the pelvis is tilted too far forward then the hips won't have any room to flex. 

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Should You Always Stretch A Tight Muscle?

TIGHTNESS CAN BE GOOD THING

In order to understand why being “tight” is a good thing, you have to understand that a muscle functions like a rubber band. For a rubber band to function properly, it must have enough tightness for it to return to its original shape and it also must be able to stretch. The further the rubber band can stretch while maintaining its tightness the more force it will produce. But if it loses that tightness it will snap. This is due to the rubber band losing its stretch-reflex mechanism. There must be equal strength between the stretching of the rubber band and how tight it is. If the band is too tight then it won’t stretch which means it can’t produce its full force potential, but if it stretches too much it will snap. In order for the rubber band to generate the most force, it must have a balanced stretch-to-reflex ratio. The same mechanism is responsible for contracting your muscles during movement. However, if a muscle cannot contract fully to its original shape due to overstretching then it will not be able to generate as much force as it once could, which puts you at a greater risk for injury. Remember, when a muscle is over-lengthened it is at a higher risk for injury due to the less force it can withstand or generate. Just think back to the rubber band, which one is easier to snap, the new one you just bought or the one from five years ago?

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Do We Need More Sleep On The Days We Exercise?

Have you ever wondered why you fall asleep at night ?

Current science isn’t really sure what makes us fall asleep, but there are some theories that have been proposed in recent years.

For today's blog post, we will focus on one of those theories. The theory is based off the idea that the byproduct of energy makes us fall asleep. To me, this makes perfect sense because I tend to sleep much better on the days when I exercise versus the days I don't. But why does this happen? How does exercise impact our sleep? To understand this mechanism we must take a couple steps back and discuss how the body makes energy. In order for your body to move and work properly the body creates an energy molecule called adenosine triphosphate (ATP). We all remember learning about this molecule called ATP right? The best way to understand how this molecule works is to think of it as a currency. For example, when you go on a walk or have a meeting you are using ATP to move and talk to your co-workers. It is responsible for everything, and without it your body and mind would be useless. But like most things in life, there is a cost to pay and ATP is no different.

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The Two Minute Workout For Fat Loss

Have you ever wondered what the least amount of exercise you could do while still obtaining some sort of health benefit from it?

We live busier lives than ever and for some, the idea of exercising 30 minutes to an hour isn't realistic nor enjoyable. For most of us, we love our workout and look forward to it but that isn't the case for everyone. There are a lot of people who dread exercise or lack the time to exercise. It could be their job, family life or just a lack of priorities. I still believe that exercise should be one of your main priorities because it enhances every aspect of your life, but that isn't the point of the this discussion. The point of this post is to answer the question above:

What is the least amount of exercise you could do while still obtaining some sort of health benefit from it?

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